Friday, September 17, 2010

Updates of Various Sorts

Roger has started feeling some side effects of the chemotherapy. Some skin rash and malaise. According to him, it's not awful, and it hasn't slowed him down at all. He still has three more days of chemo before he gets a week off. Our mantra is, "so far so good." The oncologist told us he is not adverse to lowering the dosage, if discomforts levels rise. I started to wonder what it would be like for Roger to do ten days on and ten days off, instead of lowering the dose and keeping the routine at two weeks on, one week off. Appointment with the oncologist on Monday, we'll ask him all kinds of questions.
We bought a new camera last week. It was a crazy impulse buy, but we're still glad we did it. The old camera was five years old. It was starting to be less reliable, although the photos were still okay. Something was off, maybe it was the photographer unwilling to admit aging eyes and a shakier grip. (That photographer is me, LOL!) So, we bought a Lumix DMC FZ35. It's their 2009 model, and we got a pretty good deal, one our budget could almost put up with. (Have we mentioned how expensive medical care is even with Medicare? Oy.) I'm learning how to use the camera, but it's much harder this time than it was five years ago. Geez, aging is an ongoing annoyance. I love how close this new camera lets me zoom on its "close-up" setting. Someday I'm going to learn how to shoot like a real photographer, instead of point and click. Until then, this is really fun.
I did a post five years ago on September 17th. Same day, and now the 40th anniversary. I have no words of wisdom. Life goes on. Once I was 18, now I am 58. Same heart beating.

20 comments:

  1. Just read your 35th anniversary post. Words are inadequate, but I'm strengthened by your courage.

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  2. Can you ask about vitamins? I've heard of some having good results by supplementing with them to help "bounce back" from chemo, but wouldn't dare experiment without asking the oncologist...

    About 6 months after I bought my Nikon they got the shutter lag out of them...mine you can push and count about "one and a half" before it actually fires...action stuff is lots of fun! Someday I'll do what you did...hate to give up the glass I bought with it and it doesn't interchange!

    I wish I had words for the rest of what I just read...I don't...only hugs from far too far away!

    alan

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  3. The point-and-shoot method seems to be working well. I think the really important part of the camera is the eye behind it anyway.

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  4. Robin I just read that post and am struck dumb. I can't believe what all you were made to go thru on top of the violence. At least justice was finally achieved. Thank you for sharing such a part of your life. I too admire your courage.
    Am glad roger's effects are so far bearable. I'm sure adjustments can be made. Each treatment is one less he will need.

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  5. Very glad that you treated yourself to a new camera. You'll probably get every penny of its value back at least ten times over in enjoyment.

    My advice with the chemo. The oncologists usually start off with a pretty strong dose - whatever they think you can handle. If it becomes too much and it's wiping you out, speak up sooner rather than later to see about adjusting the dose, even if it's just for awhile. Sometimes you can drop down for awhile and then go back up later.

    Robin, I've read that post and poem before and it makes me so angry and sad to think of how you had to endure such a despicable experience. However, I also marvel at how you did not let the past control your future.

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  6. Have fun with the camera. It's all in your eye, the camera just shares it with everyone else.

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  7. my oncologist has already said that he's open to reducing the dose if the
    "side effects" are too heavy. i am following the nutritionists advice to take glutamine supplement and also flax seed for omega 3 something. our diet is already way good.

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  8. jeez, so much going on. Re-reading your Sept. 17 post was a powerful jolt. Thank gawd you are a writer, a lover of words, and could tell that story with so much heart. That asshole couldn't take that away from you!

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  9. I am as moved by your courage and admiration in facing this new challenge as I was moved when I first read about the living nightmare so many years ago.

    And right now, "so far...so good" is a pretty good mantra.

    Nice photographs. I think shooting "like a real photographer" is way over-rated.

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  10. Isn't that Leica lens wonderful? I just sold my Panasonic to my office mate because I found the time it took the lens to focus really frustrating (it was 500mm). On the other hand, I got a WONDERFUL crow photo (November on the calendar--shot telephoto with macro on). Just a hint for those bird shots!

    For the 40th anniversary, I wish the pain of the memory could be erased--both the physical violence of the assault and the psychological violence of the judicial system.

    I am so glad you have the connection to the Earth to help heal your soul. And, of course, Roger, to whom I send my love and wishes for strength through the rougher patches of the battle.

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  11. Coincidentally, I just was visiting a feminist blog I like and there was a post up about an anti-rape campaign in Scotland.

    http://www.rapecrisisscotland.org.uk/campaigns/not-ever/

    The US is at least as backwards as Scotland in peoples' attitudes.

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  12. You two and your beautiful home and land are often in my thoughts. I like your new photo at the top of your blog.

    Once again I am moved by your poem that faces that terrible experience and does not cower.

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  13. great new pics with your new camera!

    hope Roger will feel less rather then more side affects.

    still at the beach going home tomorrow!

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  14. ---Thought you might enjoy This:
    "I dream of a quiet man who explains nothing but defends nothing, but only knows where the rarest wildflowers are blooming, and who goes, and finds that he is smiling not by his own will." ~ Wendell Berry

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  15. i'm late, but hugs all around. xoxo

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  16. wrapping extra (((((hugs))))) around you today

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  17. About that new camera... I'm delighted that you have it, but agree with those who say it's the eye, not the camera. Your pictures have always amazed me! Congratulations, anyway!

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  18. Robin: I reread the powerful anniversary post. I am sad and angry about what you had to endure from the criminal and the criminal justice system. But you are a survivor, still seeing beauty.
    Re: Camera as others have said, the eye behind the lens is more important than the lens itself.
    Roger: Keep up the good work!

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  19. It looks as though this camera takes very good photos. I'm glad that Roger is keeping up, but sorry to hear about the side effects of the chemo.

    I bought a camera a couple months ago, a Nikon Coolpix L110. I guess it's a pretty good camera, but I miss the viewfinder that the Canon Powershot A85 has - and the smaller size. Unfortunately, the Canon is not taking as good of pictures anymore, and really going through the batteries.

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