Sunday, December 23, 2012

Connection Junkies

Roger and I don't really feel like we live out in the boonies. We're a 45 minute drive to the capitol of the most populated state in the country. We're six miles from Interstate 80. That's right I-80, the most well-traveled interstate in the country. We're seven miles from a 24-hour Safeway. Seriously. We're not out in the boonies. And yet… and yet… every freakin' time it rains our internet goes down and our telephone line has buzzing static that makes conversation impossible.

Here's the thing about living rurally, you have to be willing to put up with a lot of cranky back-woods stuff that drives us "experienced" city folk crazy. I have to stop myself from calling ATT and saying things I would regret ever showing up in print and accurately attributed to me. Aren't we all living in the 21st century at the same time? How is that things can be this technologically funky so close to the real world of high-tech?

Winter has arrived. We're already 158% above average rainfall, and the storms keep coming. The clouds have darkened the already darkened winter skies, and there has been very little actual bright daylight for a while. Not particularly good for photographing anything, unless you want to see gray winter bleakness at its bleakest best (or would that be worst?).

I have to wonder if our internet disconnect would have been quite as disastrous had it occurred in summer, when we could have gone on hikes in the high country or at least good long walks on local trails. I confess that a few days without our DSL on day-after-day of rain compelled us to seek a similar drug that required a two-year contract and a little device that lets us connect to the internet via cell phone towers. Of course we live in a 3G environment that not even Virgin Mobile recognizes, so our Verizon Jetpack provides a slightly faster than dialup fix. We were absolutely delighted.

Hello, we're the Dharma Bums, and we're connection junkies.


PS -- I did go out the other day to photograph the beautiful big mushrooms growing on the bark next to one of our woodpiles. I looked up at a clear sky and saw a stunningly brief and beautiful iridescent cloud.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

13 comments:

  1. Thank goodness you are at least tech-savy so you can get around temporary problems.

    I remember living in a thoroughly modern house at the base of De La Veaga Park, and every single time the wind blew, our little cud-de-sac lost power. We were one freaking mile from the center of town! And this was in the days before internet (at home anyway).

    It's a mystery.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I feel your pain. I live in a tiny town--well relatively near one--and a good sneeze takes out our ISP. Frustrating but a good plan B is always handy. Would not trade one disconnected moment for one in a crowded city that holds Nature at bay.
    Wishing you and Roger a Happy Holidays and a healthy, peaceful 2013

    ReplyDelete
  3. Have a great holiday, Robin Andrea! And, don't complain too much about the surfeit of precipitation; it could be much worse in the other direction.

    Kali and I will be retiring to the boonies in Colorado from suburban Philadelphia. It'll be a big adjustment, I'm sure.

    We joke that every time it sprinkles, we lose electricity. Of course, I'm exaggerating, but we DO lost power at a greater frequency than I think we ought, given that we're two miles from the Philadelphia city line.

    You must live in Iridescent Cloud Central!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Merry Christmas, Bums! And a happy, healthy New Year!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Happy Solstice and holidays Bums. You are the best! peace MandT & Bodhi Dog

    ReplyDelete
  6. Happy holidays and let's hope for an outbreak of good news in the coming year.

    I love that you keeping looking up at the sky and seeing amazing things!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Merry Christmas and Happy Winter !

    ReplyDelete
  8. At our old farm back in Ontario, the phone line always buzzed and crackled so much after a rain that it was unusable - and the internet wouldn't work over it. When WiMax became available in our area, I was the first person to sign up and set up a receiver. That worked well for the couple of more years we were there before I sold the place and left. I use my ipad running on 3G at the Nova Scotia house. It is remarkably reliable, but costly if you go over 5 gigs of use per month - easy to do if you start watching youtube videos! Just some of the trade-offs to living away from the rat race.

    Happy holidays and best wishes to both of you in the coming year!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Merry Merry to you and yours!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Greetings! I've been out of contact due to the final demise of the Macbook that, bent and bowed,had survived Phil's car accident. He got me a swell little KindleFire, upon which I am now picking away. So amidst connectivity, I was not conected.
    It is raining like a mofo up here,to, and is in the high 30' s. BLEAH.
    So warm winter greetings to you guys from your pagan atheist friends!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Greetings! I've been out of contact due to the final demise of the Macbook that, bent and bowed,had survived Phil's car accident. He got me a swell little KindleFire, upon which I am now picking away. So amidst connectivity, I was not conected.
    It is raining like a mofo up here,to, and is in the high 30' s. BLEAH.
    So warm winter greetings to you guys from your pagan atheist friends!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Y'all don't whine too much about rain, ok?

    http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/expert_assessment/seasonal_drought.html

    ReplyDelete
  13. It really is odd that connectivity is so unreliable in so many places. One of my brothers lives 14 miles from a reasonably good-sized university whose students are from all over the world and whose students regularly communicate "back home." Yet my brother cannot even get DSL "out in the boonies" where he lives. Fourteen miles away from a university! Craziness!

    ReplyDelete