Sunday, August 17, 2014

The Last Photos From The Old Camera

The Panasonic Lumix FZ35 died on Friday. We were out at the marsh walking along watching the sandpipers and willets, the godwits and avocets, when I noticed that the on/off switch on the camera stopped working. The switch was in a constant "on" position and slid easily between the two ends, making no connection at either.

When we got home, Roger tried taking it apart, but those cameras have crazy insides like weirdly wired little robots. No hint of what thing does what to which other little thing to make pretty pictures. He couldn't even get to the on/off switch which was behind a shield that had no hint of entry. When he put the tiny, tiny screws back in the camera was dead.

I'm surprised I never thought about what kind of new camera to get, even though I had been disappointed with the old camera's ability (or lack thereof) to autofocus on clouds. It hardly ever captured what I saw with my old eyes. I know I'm a lazy bum when it comes to understanding photography. I have learned the names of hundreds of birds and many, many cloud formations, arcs, halos, and atmospheric phenomenon over the years. But no matter how many times I tried to grasp shutter speed and aperture, iso--blahblahblah, it never made any sense to me, and I promptly forgot it every time! So, here I am thinking about buying a new camera and trying to figure out what to get that won't tax my brain, but will show the close-ups and the far-aways with vivid clarity.

These are a few of the photos I took over the past week, the last from the old camera. When Roger and I are on the road, we never eat road food. We always pack a lunch to take with us. When we drove from southern California to the beach house, we stopped at Pismo Beach to eat our sandwiches. When we drove from the beach house back to Arcata, we made a special stop and had our homemade egg salad sandwiches sitting in the sanctuary garden at our blogger friend's house. "M" lost his loving partner Trace last month, so we stopped by to hug him and take one of the last photos the old camera clicked.

18 comments:

  1. Love the portrait in the sanctuary garden. You used that old camera well. So much to see and share as you take a good long look around.

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  2. Sorry it is not longer working but it did you right proud while it worked. I am like you on the fine parts of photography. Good luck with your new one.

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  3. Time for a new camera adventure, I'd say. I'm sure your eye is better at composing a photo than any camera ever could be. I should probably get a new camera as well -- I've been consistently disappointed with mine. But I'll probably be getting an iPhone soon, and that will settle it.

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  4. That old camera captured a most delightful meeting with the bums and moi. What a wonderful, sun drenched day! Michael

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  5. am-- The planet is so awesomely beautiful, it's hard not to take a grand photo everyday!

    Arkansas Patti-- We did have a pretty good time together, that old camera and me. Now on to something else. Sure wish I knew what!

    Pablo-- I've noticed that new cameras come with wifi type connections. Oy. I guess they have to compete with smart phones. I'm looking forward to seeing what your iPhone pics look like.

    karmanot-- We loved meeting you. It was a wonderful heart connection. We look forward to the next time our paths cross.

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  6. Worth trying to get these things working - even if the attempt is doomed. It often strikes me as silly how in these days when everything is supposed to be green, nothing is mendable!

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  7. Robin Andrea,
    I have worn out my wife's little Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS15 12MP. I've carried it around for two years in my pants pocket and it has taken a beating, but it has given me the opportunity to capture stuff that I was then able to learn more about as I went googling later.
    I'd love to know what you decide on as a replacement for yours. I also need something that captures distance objects since this has been a limitation for the little Lumix. This winter I want to be able to get nice shots of birds at our feeders. I've focused on close-ups and it has done well. It also has a fairly quick trigger. The other camera I bought a few year back was not very friendly in that regard and I missed many creatures waiting for the shutter to do its thing.
    I love reading your blog. I feel a kinship of spirit with you both.
    aubrey

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  8. sackerson-- Good point! I checked these internets for diagrams of the inner workings of this camera and couldn't find a thing. I wish things were more easily repairable.

    FBtT-- The Panasonic cameras have been very good. I appreciate their steadiness for those close ups shots. I may go with another Lumix, but friends have also suggested Canon, Fuji, and Nikon. So many choices. I would like to hold the camera in my hands before I buy it. I would like to get a feel for how it works, and if it's easy to use and understand. I will keep you posted. And, thank you for your kind words about kinship. The blog has introduced us to many a good and thoughtful person, like long distance neighbors.

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    Replies
    1. robin andrea,
      Thanks for your reply. I saw a promotional comment from Lilian Stokes about the Canon SX-50 and how powerful it zoom was.

      http://stokesbirdingblog.blogspot.com/2013/02/canon-sx-50-hs-for-bird-photography-i.html

      I'm still thinking about a Lumix, but I'll be interested in which way you go with yours.

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    2. From Bluebirds to Turtles-- Thank you so much for that link. OMG! That camera is amazing. I'm definitely going to check that out. It takes spectacular photos. I put the battery back in the old Lumix and it turned on. The on/off switch is still broken but I can use it while I contemplate which camera to get. The Canon SX 50 looks fantastic.

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  9. I have a Nikon that is loaded with bells and whistles, none of which I use. I'm pretty much point and shoot...changing lenses is as complicated as I get. So my next camera will be a really good point and shoot.

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  10. I wish I could suggest a good pocket camera. I have an old Canon which has given very good service, but it's shutter response is terrible. Maybe the newer ones are better. I gave Leah a Nikon P&S but its focus was terrible. It seemed like we could never get a shot in focus. An SLR is best for focus and shutter response, but, of course, it doesn't fit in a pocket. My iPhone gets pretty good shots, but it has a pretty wide angle lens, so it's not for shooting distant objects. Good luck with whatever you choose. You certainly have the eye, so the camera will have a lot to live up to.

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  11. NCmountainwoman-- Yes, it's the abundance of bells and whistles that always confuse the photographic moment for me. I see that it's going to be an interesting search to find just what I'm looking for.

    Mark-- I probably won't get a pocket camera. I do want something that will focus well both close and far, and have a reliable shutter response, but not so complicated that 90% of it will go un-used. This is going to be an interesting adventure, especially because we live so far from big stores, and may not get a chance to actually hold the thing, look through the viewfinder or take a practice shot before we get to buy it. Ah, the modern world.

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  12. yes, the number of choices is mind-boggling. Good luck with that. Love these photos.

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  13. Tara-- Glad you liked these photos. Now, on to the next big adventure, the world of shopping! You know how much we love that-- NOT!

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  14. Hi Robin! Under most conditions, just about all of today's cameras make pretty good decisions when on auto. Anyway, the most important thing about taking good photos is the "eye" of the photographer. You have a fantastic eye. You will take good photos no matter what camera you buy.

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  15. How could your camera give up when you give it such splendid, luminous opportunities? Anyway, I'm sure it died happy, and a warm welcome to the new one.

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  16. Pat-- I have so much trepidation about buying a new camera. It's funny because all I ever do is auto-focus and zoom. I just have such high expectations of outcomes. Thank you for your kind words and encouragement.

    Anonymous-- I really should do an update because I plugged the battery back in the other day, and the camera came back to life. The on/off switch is still broken, and fortunately it is broken in the "on" position. I take the battery out when I'm not using it. So, I have a little time before I buy a new camera.

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