Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Almost Wordless Wednesday: Many Robins

Robins with a Killdeer. Can you see it?

Robins in the setting sunlight

Robins gathered in a winter willow

Robins wondering if there is a better tree someplace else

13 comments:

  1. Yep. Spotted the Killdeer. I wouldn't mind seeing one over here; they do occur occasionally but I've never seen one.
    Birds always brighten a winter day.

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  2. You have some strange Robins over there, in the UK they are very territorial and would not have another that close.
    My link show a Robin in my garden.
    http://spudsdailyphoto.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/robin-with-dinner.html

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  3. Killdeer are actually common in parking lots here in the Midwest. I think the islands and medians, especially if they are graveled, are desirable nesting sites. Lotsa robins too.

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  4. I used to see killdeer a lot when I was growing up; they would be running around the fields where our horses grazed.
    Our robins, sentimentally named "robin" by homesick settlers from England, are thrushes. I've read where people have scoffed at North American robins for having an inferior song, but I think the songs of thrushes are some of the most beautiful of any bird, and to hear their haunting songs echoing through our wooded landscapes makes any day magical.

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  5. Goodness, did that lonely Killdeer get lost or was he raised by robins? I love when robins swarm. They make the ground look like a undulating surface.

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  6. John-- So glad you spotted the Killdeer. I didn't actually see it in the field, only in the photo. What a surprise!

    Bill-- Love seeing the robins you have there. So beautiful and different from ours here. Our robins are very territorial, but seem to gather in large flocks as well.

    Pablo-- How interesting that the Killdeer hang out in parking lots and median strips. I would have never guessed that.

    CCorax-- One of my most favorite bird songs is the Swainson's Thrush. I've only heard it a few times when we were living on the Olympic Peninsula. It was a sound that filled the forest with the most beautiful, plaintive notes.

    Arkansas Patti-- The pasture land where these birds are is often filled with shorebirds after big rains. It attracts a lot of insect-eating critters. Just the other day I photographed my very first long-billed curlew there. What a surprise that was!

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  7. Love the killdeer with the robins! Wonderful series of photos! A good reminder to watch for robins up here. Won't be long now. A sign of spring. I have a book from the 1940s called Little Killdeer:

    http://www.amazon.com/Little-Killdeer-Ruth-Wheeler/dp/B002F10T80

    "... The ducks which had just alighted on the pond sprang into the air and flew away out of danger ... Again and again Little Killdeer flew over the marsh and the pond crying his warning until not a duck was in sight. Then he glided back to the ridge and waited, standing tall and straight as he had often seen his father do when he listened for danger. Proudly he walked back and forth. He was no longer Little Killdeer; he was the warning cry of the meadow ... "

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  8. A whole lot of robins, Robin.

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  9. am-- Love that quote. Thank you so much for that.

    Sabine-- Yes, my little birdie namesake!

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  10. Those photographs of the robins in the trees is truly amazing. Even more so because I have never seen more than one in a tree at a time. Almost always I see many of them in a meadow or yard, but never in trees. Fantastic, especially the pair in the setting sun.

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  11. NCmountainwoman-- I was so surprised to see such a large flock of them together. It's really been quite the robin season here! Glad you liked the photos. Thank you.

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  12. I read the blog Backyard and Beyond because it is about nature in my daughter's Brooklyn neighborhood. There was a recent post about a one-eyed Cardinal, and I commented on it telling about stick Robin. The blogger then replied saying that patterns of migration were first being understood when European storks would return in the spring with African spears through their bodies.

    Hardy animals, birds!

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  13. Pablo-- That is so interesting and spooky about patterns of migration. We have recently noticed another Robin on one of our walks that stands out as an individual. He has two very distinct leucistic spots on the back of his head. He truly stands out, and we've seen him a few times hanging around the same yard. It's not Stick Robin, but it is White-Patch Boy!

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