Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Almost Wordless Wednesday: Wildlife Out The Kitchen Window

One day I'm extolling the virtues of leaving wildlife to the wild lands, the very next day I look out the kitchen window and watch this juvenile Cooper's hawk land on the light pole. Oh yes, I was glad to see it!

17 comments:

  1. We have or fair share of Hawks & Kites flying round our garden. a bit further out you will see deer, foxes & badgers. Reading your last post I could not agree more which is why I'm glad I live where I do. Check this blog out of a guy I know fro our village who watches the wildlife.
    http://cholseywildlife.blogspot.co.uk/

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  2. You're inconsistent, a gloriously inconsistent human!

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  3. For goodness sake, Roger. There are Red-tailed Hawks raising chicks on a window ledge at the Franklin Institute science museum in central Philadelphia and Peregrine Falcons raising chicks on the bridges spanning the Delaware River within sight of Philadelphia's city hall. You'll never be completely free of wildlife (nor, as I'm fully aware, do you want to be).

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  4. Bill-- Thank you for the link. Great photos!

    Pablo-- I enjoy my inconsistencies immensely!

    Scott- Roger didn't write this post. I know all about the hawks and falcons nesting in big cities. In my original post about not wanting to see wildlife, I actually thought about mentioning that it seems different about birds. They are everywhere. Although window strikes kill them by the millions literally. I don't want to be free of wildlife, I want them to be free of us. A distinct difference.

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  5. Wind turbines kill many birds in the quest for cleaner energy. so go the tradeoffs...

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  6. We are having an outbreak of hysteria locally in the wake of a hearing about releasing some rattle snakes on an island in the Quabbin Reservoir. Apparently a large number of hysterics think the snakes will reproduce at olympic rates, swim to the mainland and spread throughout suburbia.
    I went to a conference back in the 80s where a man who headed the endangered species program for Mass Wildlife pointed out that people are all for saving endangered species when you trot out the bald eagles, but they get upset over rattle snakes and want them wiped out. He said that both species have a place in the ecosystem and both deserve to be saved.
    We create hierarchies of value, then tell this species "you're okay" and that species "you deserve to die out."
    Hey Phil, why just pets and kids? Why not adults?

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  7. Bob R-- There is a lot of talk in the deserts of California where wind turbines may go, of how disastrous it would be for birds. I have often wondered why power generation isn't more local? And then I remember who gets rich from it being a huge business. Sad news for wildlife.

    CCorax-- Interesting story about the rattlesnakes. Ignorance abounds coast to coast. For some reason your comment reminded me about what life was like out in the rural Sierra foothills. I once thought, dreamer that I am, that people sought refuge out in the country to find harmony and peace, like-minded neighbors, a tribal consciousness of respect for our beautiful earth. Instead I found right wing nutcases, people who moved out into the woods so they wouldn't have to make eye contact with other humans, who couldn't care less about wildlife habitat or sustainable living. Ignorance abounds. Good question to Phil, in fact I would say, "let the pets and kids live, just go after the adults." Hah!

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  8. That hawk landed there to show you something! Clever hawk.

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  9. Tara-- It wanted me to see those talons and that beautiful intense raptor stare.

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  10. Too funny! Every so often we suddenly see all the birds flee the feeders. More often than not we spot our juvenile Cooper's Hawk in the trees. Once we had a Sharpshinned hit the side of the house. She was chasing birds at the feeders and did not pull up in time. Fortunately she sat on the deck for a while and they flew off.

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  11. I knew you still harbored the thrill when seeing wildlife. We may push it down with logic and compassion but it is such a treat, we can't help but enjoy.

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  12. Some animals do well around people, but usually when wild animals and humans cross paths, the animals suffer from the encounter.
    Spending a lot of time in the desert, and knowing a lot of people there. I truly believe that the companies building all of these so called green energy creating spots in the desert, don't give a freaking hoot about animals, people, history, or anything else. It is all about money.

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  13. NCmountainwoman-- Often the collision between birds and human-made objects don't work out so well for the bird. Glad that sharpshinned was okay.

    Arkansas Patti-- It is a thrill to see wildlife. It's good to be reminded.

    Pat-- That's how I see it, the intersection of humans and wildlife doesn't work out so well for wildlife. I wish they had lots more space to fly and roam. Absolutely true about the energy companies and the earth, pure exploitation at is worst.

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  14. I completely understand the point of your previous post about not seeing wildlife outside the window, but it is nice to see a little. Some types of wildlife adapt so well to human habitats that they seem to migrate to them from more remote areas. Foxes, raccoons and possums seem to do that. Sometimes hawks also seem fairly at home in urban/suburban areas.

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  15. Mark P-- Yes, it is wonderful to see them. I have loved every sight. It's true some wildlife do adapt, but it often comes with a price. I've been reading about coyotes and bobcats dying from rodent poisons. You are a safe neighbor for wildlife, not all neighbors are as thoughtful.

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  16. I have a cooper's hawk visiting my feeders. He will fly in and sit very openly just above the feeder. We all can see him clearly so he never gets anything and I send him off after a bit of a rest.

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  17. Nora-- We had a Cooper's visiting our bird feeders too. They are smart and opportunistic.

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