Wednesday, May 04, 2016

True Story

You are not going to believe this, but it's absolutely true.

I've had my Lumix camera for probably a year and a half. Plenty of time to figure out its quirks and commands. My previous Lumix had a Macro focus feature on the dial with a little picture of a flower. I would just turn that little dial and be able to zoom in and focus on insects, flowers, all the little things of our little universe. The current Lumix does not have that feature on the dial. It has plenty of letters and little graphics for choices: P (programmable); A (aperture); S (shutter speed); M (manual exposure); a little camera and M (Creative Video). There are a few others, but you get the point, no little flower, no macro feature. So, I would try to get as close as I could with the camera set on the P dial and hope for a good close up photo of the little things.

Well, the other day, I was trying to figure something out with the camera and discovered another little button next to the little screen. It had these letters AF; AF with a little flower; and MF. Mmmm. I've always just had the camera set AF. When I clicked on to AF with the little flower graphic guess what I found? I could take close-up photos of flower petals and spiders. I couldn't believe I hadn't noticed the little (very little) flower graphic.

So, now I'm running outside to check on the jumping spiders that are everywhere and the roses blooming out by the fence. There hasn't been much in the way of atmospheric optics here lately, and most of our birds have headed north for breeding season. So it's just me and the little things. And, I am pretty happy about it!

26 comments:

  1. Welcome back to the world of little things. I thought it was just us men who tried to figure everything out without reading the instruction book! :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. always a fun moment :) and your readers reap the benefit of your discovery. Lovely photos

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'd have given up. Way to persevere. So great now that you can capture the really cute face of the jumping spider.

    ReplyDelete
  4. John beat me to the men vs instruction manual idea. Ha!
    The photos are lovely. I especially like the onion/chive/whatever it is flower. How'd you get the jumping spider to sit still long enough to photograph?

    ReplyDelete
  5. John-- Hah! I looked at the manual and still couldn't figure it out.

    Rain-- I was so happy I ran outside looking for spiders. Usually they are everywhere, but it was very cold and gray and almost everyone was hiding. I am really looking forward to photographing all the insects we see here.

    Arkansas Patti-- I actually had given up. So it was a really grand surprise to find that little little button. Jumping spiders are the cutest!

    CCorax-- I thought of you when I found that button. I couldn't believe I hadn't noticed it before. That spider hardly sat still. I tried to get closer but it kept ducking out of sight. Cute cute cute.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Just in time for the flower season. Perfect.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I just love the little world!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Loren-- I'm really happy about it!

    MandT-- Me too. I had forgotten all the fun I have getting up close to the little things.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I keep promising myself to read the manual that came with my camera...so far, I have managed to put that off for about 18 months, and counting!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Susan-- I read the manual, but found most of it to be about things I didn't want to do. So, I put it down and never picked it up again.

    Pablo-- LOL. Thank you so much for that laugh.

    ReplyDelete
  11. yes, this is where Rich would be saying, "Read the manual" and I would be in my not always successful "learn by doing." I'm stubborn about it. Your photos are always lovely always in focus. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  12. amarkonmywall-- I tried the manual approach when I first got the camera, but it did not resonate with me at all. Not sure why. Maybe geared toward a different kind of photographer. Really glad you like the photos.

    ReplyDelete
  13. That's great. I love sitting here with my iPad blowing pictures to way bigger than the subject would be in life. The flower pictures here are wonderful and allow me to do that.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Nasreen-- That's the best part of macro photography is seeing things bigger than they are in life. The details can be pretty breathtaking.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Huzzah! Bring on the nanopics!

    ReplyDelete
  16. R.Powers-- I've been having so much fun even photographing flies. Close-ups are so cool.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Looking forward to more close-ups of little things. With my intuitive style of learning (ha!), I rarely spend much time with instruction books. It is a joy when I figure something out on my own, never mind how long it might take (-:

    ReplyDelete
  18. am-- I have been pressing all kinds of buttons on the camera now, and hoping that I can find a way to restore everything when I screw things up! Hah!

    kathy a-- Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Isn't there a song called "Little Things Mean a Lot?" So many gadgets and gizmos these days. Maybe too many. The close-ups are nice!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Pat-- I'm surprised by how many little buttons there are on this camera, and how many directions there are to go, once the buttons are pushed. It's a strange new world, and I don't quite speak the language.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I can understand this truly! The cameras now are so complicated. I have two Lumix cameras and I am sure I do not know all they can do! I think your macros turned out really good also.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Nora-- I didn't know you use a Lumix too. For some reason I preferred the earlier model than the one I have now. I think they are programmed to do too many things in an array of technical programming to appeal to both point and clickers and real photographers. Way to confusing for me. Glad you like the pics!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Peggy—my wife—and I saw at least one hummingbird through the winter this year and finally decided to buy him a feeder. By then, it was early Spring, and he didn’t need it so much, although he occasionally uses it. I remember from feeding hummers in Mississippi that you get more of them with every passing year, so I know that persistence is important. Peggy’s father got so many that he ended up with several feeders. I like the kind that the birds can sit upon while they’re eating.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Snowbrush-- We're hoping to plant a flower garden that will be year-round and enough to feed the hummingbirds all year long. We'd like to wean them off sugar water and get them back to flower nectar.

    ReplyDelete