Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Almost Wordless Wednesday: Iridescence and Corona

I decided to go out and take one last look at the sky on Sunday. I blocked the sun with the roof and gutter and saw this. A corona formation that became iridescent and then back to corona. Five minutes of dazzling color, and then it was gone.







17 comments:

  1. I like how you did that. If that was at my house water would be dripping on you from the rain we are having at the moment

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  2. That is so cool. I will try that roof, sun blocking trick again to see if I can also see that. So far, I am doing something wrong but I really enjoy it vicariously via your shots.

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  3. Oh this is soo amazing. Thank you.

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  4. beautiful. no wonder you eschew psychotropic drugs: you don't need them!!

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  5. Bill-- Blocking the sun is the only safe way to see these colors. I hope the rain stops and the wispy clouds stay to delight.

    Arkansas Patti-- When there are a few light clouds around the sun, find a way to block the sun and take a peek. You may see these colors. I'm hopeful!

    Sabine-- Thank you! So glad you like these.

    Tara-- Seriously! The natural world is an ongoing light show.

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  6. A lovely series of shifting colour. Untold millions of tiny water drops bathed in sunlight made them.

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  7. you are a magnet to the wonders of the natural world! so glad I know you. <3

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  8. I so seldom see iridescence; you are lucky!

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  9. Les-- I cannot tell you how happy it makes me to have you stop by and comment. I wouldn't know any names for these beautiful atmospheric optics if not for you. Thank you.

    Sky-- I often think of the Leonard Cohen lyrics of Suzanne-- "she shows you where to look amid the garbage and the flowers..."

    kenju-- I have learned where to look. They don't always show up, but when they're there...WOW!

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  10. Beautiful! It's like the clouds are a body of water and someone's tossed a pebble in, making the colors ripple.

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  11. CCorax-- I love that analogy. Makes me think of this info from Atmospheric Optics:
    The mean droplet size is changing along the cloud and so distorting the rings.
    When the droplet size changes are more chaotic the corona becomes unstructured and we have instead an iridescent cloud.

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  12. Nice shots, and nice shots in the previous post, too. I was watching something on TV the other day about NASA's unexplained stuff (conspiracy stuff mainly) and they were absolutely astounded by something that was seen during a space launch. It was some plain, garden-variety iridescence in the clouds the rocket was passing near. As if no one in the world had ever seen such a thing.

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  13. Mark-- Glad you liked these cloud/sky pics. How interesting and surprising that NASA was astounded by iridescent clouds. I mean, I'm still astounded by their beauty, but not astounded by them happening.

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  14. Optimistic Existentialist-- Glad you liked these photos. Thank you.

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  15. So beautiful such dazzling color!
    I've never seen anything like it.
    Great photos, Robin Andrea!

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  16. sonia-- I'm very drawn to iridescent clouds and atmospheric optics. The interaction of sunlight and ice crystals can be stunning. So glad you liked the photos.

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