Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Wordless Wednesday: Pelicans


15 comments:

  1. They look like boats, so stately, with those lovely big wings, like outriggers. Beautiful pics!

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  2. We're denied the company and beauty of Pelicans on this side of the ocean so I always enjoy seeing photos.

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  3. Great looking birds. I've never seen one up close.

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  4. Our glimpse into the age of dinosaurs.

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  5. Gorgeous photos! I've never seen pelicans in person. I wish I could to see them.
    You all have a happy day!

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  6. It's amazing the way they pop out of the photos. I really like these pics.

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  7. Infrafrenata-- We love watching them. Glad you liked the photos.

    John-- I sometimes wonder about posting photos of birds we see often, and then I remember that not everyone gets to see them. Glad you liked these photos.

    Sharon-- They are truly "oddly elegant" birds, as the Cornell Lab of Ornithology describes them.

    CCorax-- Yes! A look back in time.

    sonia-- Thank you. So glad you liked these.

    Nasreen-- My favorite is the one with the mountains in the background. They really do pop out!

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  8. wonderful creatures!!! Great shots Robin.

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  9. Aww, I miss pelicans since I left Fl. It was always fun to watch them hang around while fishermen cleaned their daily catch. I think each fisherman had his own dedicated group.

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  10. Sabine-- I'm not sure if they migrate. Here's what the Ornithology website says:
    Brown Pelicans live year-round in estuaries and coastal marine habitats along both the east and west coasts. They breed between Maryland and Venezuela, and between southern California and southern Ecuador—often wandering farther north after breeding as far as British Columbia or New York. On the Atlantic and Gulf coasts they breed mostly on barrier islands, natural islands in estuaries, and islands made of refuse from dredging, but in Florida and southern Louisiana they primarily use mangrove islets. On the West Coast they breed on dry, rocky offshore islands. When not feeding or nesting, they rest on sandbars, pilings, jetties, breakwaters, mangrove islets, and offshore rocks.

    Tara-- Glad you liked these pics!

    Arkansas Patti-- We used to watch them in Capitola on the wharf. They liked the fishermen there too. Such beautiful creatures.

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  11. Absolutely beautiful. I miss seeing pelicans. Have seen them out on the Washington coast near the Columbia River. Not sure how far north they can be seen. Very rarely are pelicans seen here in the Salish Sea. May have mentioned something I heard in dream many years ago:

    Pelicans are the guardians of the world.

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  12. am-- Your comment reminds me that once when we were still living in Port Townsend we saw a pelican. It was a surprise because we hadn't seen one there before (or after). I like your dream.

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