Wednesday, November 23, 2016

garden update november 1

garden posts are for us to have some record as it is not easy to remember what and when we planted. garden news is also a nice respite from all the other news. and it is fun to share. how is your garden doing? yes, the pictures were taken nov 1. i am a bit late posting.



two views of the beds which will get some sun all winter. carrots, beets(red and white), lettuce, kale(three kinds, two ravaged by bugs), chard(rainbow), and peas. we did roughly plan for winter stuff but this really worked out very well. we are due to get some cedar trees behind the west fence trimmed, which will give these beds much more sunlight this winter.
this bed has chard and beets. it will get very little sun til march. the tree trimming will give it a bit more but the house next door blocks it most of the day.

23 comments:

  1. Sounds like it worked very well for you, ours id looking a little dull at the moment with winter setting in and all the leaves falling off the trees

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. we do enjoy a mild climate here. and we have no deciduous trees close by

      Delete
  2. I love those garden boxes. Being that it has suddenly turned to seasonal weather here in NJ, the gardening is over. However, we had a great gardening season this year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. no snow here. likely no frost. the boxes on dirt do better than the boxes on concrete. (well duh roger)

      Delete
  3. Is the house itself preventing some of the beds from getting sunlight? If so, couldn't you move it? I mean, you've moved buildings before with your super powers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. it's the neighbor's house that blocks the low sun. they might not want it moved

      Delete
    2. don't make any assumptions, maybe just to Nevada.

      Delete
    3. That's very funny. They just bought the house last month. Maybe they would like Nevada instead. Hah!

      Delete
  4. Our garden looks horrible with a few days earlier that barely froze and then lots and lots of rain. After Thanksgiving we need to pull it all. I had hoped for rototilling this fall but the ground has been too wet all along. We need to work in more top soil from other sources as ours is heavy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. the rain here did kill the tomatoes. our "soil", under 3 inches of sod, is sticky gray clay. thus raised beds with imported dirt

      Delete
  5. hey, do those artichokes produce? I've killed 2 of them so far. Maybe Davis is too darned hot for them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. they do. i tried a small one that was way past its prime. bitter. we see them often around arcata. our climate is pretty close to that of the artichoke capital of the world.

      Delete
  6. I am so envious of your garden plus your mild climate. I can grow Kale here as it loves the cold. I have shaken snow off the plants to harvest them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. kale is tough. i have even eaten carrots harvested under snow.

      Delete
  7. Love the photos with your shadow. I'm reminded of the vegetable garden my father tended year-round in Gualala for 25 years. Sweet. Can't think of any place I'd rather be than on the coast of Humboldt County or Mendocino County in fall and winter. Beautiful light. Fierce storms, yes, but so many fine clear sunny days.

    I have some Coast Redwood seeds in my refrigerator for the suggested 30+ days, hoping they will sprout after I take them out on December 1st. That's what the directions on the seed package said would happen. We'll see. My yoga teacher up in Everson, WA, has a 25-year-old Coast Redwood in their yard, brought as a seedling from friends in Santa Cruz in the 1980s. I'm thinking bonsai, as all I have is a small porch garden.

    Speaking of artichokes, my father grew the most delicious artichokes I have ever eaten. I don't see that
    type of artichoke in the stores very often, only sometimes in January. He didn't grow globe artichokes. They weren't perfectly shaped or without blemish, but they were so tender that we could eat the stalks, and the stalk tasted as good as the heart. Good memories!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. we planted several coast redwoods in port townsend that we took from santa cruz when we moved north.

      artichokes grow well here but we never see where someone has taken a bud.

      Delete
  8. I bow in admiration of your gardening skills, sir. Would that I had the capacity to garden as you and Robin do.

    ReplyDelete
  9. bow gratefully accepted. practice grasshopper, endless practice.

    ReplyDelete
  10. It looks nice, but the very idea of having a garden seems strange right now, since we are still deep in a drought. Also, our soil would require extensive amendment to produce much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. no drought here. record setting rain. our so called soil here is sticky, gooey blue clay. we bought 5 cubic yards of topsoil, hauled laboriously in a wheelbarrow from the driveway to the back yard, to fill our raised beds.

      Delete
  11. Wow. Those gardens look great! Nice way to remember. I have flowers planted all over, but don't know which ones, and exactly where.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. thanks. we take lots of pictures of the garden so we have a clue about what's where. your flowers will reveal themselves.

      Delete
  12. My vegetable garden consists of 2 cherry tomato plants. Oddly, they are decided to rebloom about 2 weeks ago. I'm just going to wait and see what happens next!

    ReplyDelete