Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Almost Wordless Wednesday: Bull Whip Kelp

We headed out to Trinidad Beach on Sunday for another mind-calming, therapeutic walk. It was a beautiful day, and we saw monsters (!) in the harbor.
Part way up the trail, looking north

Top of the trail, looking north at the same beach
Heading down the other side looking southeast at the harbor

What are those crazy monsters in the sea

Our first look at Bull Whip Kelp, native to the west coast
We've seen lots of Giant Kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) in Monterey Bay, but this was our first look at Bull Whip Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana). Another reminder of the crazy awesome beauty of our earth.

24 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Bill-- We hadn't seen kelp like this before either!

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  2. Lovely hues of blue; I liked the info on bullwhip kelp, too. Wonder if our band could get some people to play kelp horns...

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    1. isabelita-- I loved the hues of blue too. Some parts were so turquoise-y. It was beautiful. Love idea of kelp horns in your band!

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  3. Now I never heard of Bull Whip Kelp now I have. Your last post was a bit sad so here is a blog that should raise your sprits. Have a great Christmas & new year. I'm taking a break till then.
    http://prunellapepperpot.blogspot.co.uk/2017/12/prunella-pepperpots-magical-christmas.html

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    1. Bill-- Thank you so much for the link. So much appreciated. Enjoy your blog break. Looking forward to reading you in the new year.

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  4. Wow! There are few things that bring me more joy than experiencing sunny winter days at the ocean in Northern California. Thank you so much! I was just reading that in the old Julian Calendar, December 13 was considered the darkest day of the year. There is so much light in these photos. The sun, the sky, the ocean. Even the kelp shines! The next time I am at West Beach, a hour of south of here, I will look more closely at the kelp. Now I am wondering if it is Bull Whip Kelp. West Beach is the closest I get to the open ocean these days. It faces the opening to the Pacific Ocean, looking across the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strait_of_Juan_de_Fuca

    On this dark morning, I can see a lovely crescent moon rising above the foothills and the Big Dipper above and to the north. Yes. Such beauty.

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    1. am-- I would love to know if you are seeing bull whip kelp there. Yes, we have been having some beautiful weather here. Blue skies and lots of sunshine. I'm loving it. I ran out in the morning to see the crescent moon, and I got a glimpse of Jupiter too.

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  5. I never knew there were different kinds of kelp in such a localized area. I thought kelp was kelp, period! Nice photos, and thanks for educating us all a bit more about your corner of the world. :)

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    1. Steve-- I was also so surprised to see how many different kinds of kelp there are. Such interesting sea life out there.

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  6. I'm jealous of your sunshine and beautiful pictures. We've had unusually warm weather. 40* temps in December in Alaska is too warm. Lots of clouds, wind and rain.

    I saw lots of the bull whip kelp in Kodiak last year when I was there. Some was drying out on the beach and a little stinky.

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    1. Dave-- Last year at this time we were inundated with rain day after day after day. This has been a wonderful respite. We were so surprised to see this kelp and discovered that it only grows on the west coast, all the way up to Alaska. Maybe we'll get to see in it its dry stinky stage soon!

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  7. Ah, the world is full of unexpected and surprising things. Alabama - who would have thought?

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    1. John-- The news out of Alabama made me sooooo happy last night. Such a relief. Now we're hoping it will continue. It would be good news for the whole planet.

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  8. Thanks, I enjoyed the link. Amazing all the uses for the kelp and it makes me wonder who thought of them all and how? What made a native look at the kelp and decide it would make good line if multiple steps were taken?

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    1. Patti-- Aren't people creative? It's so cool to see what people can do. I love the journey a monster kelp can send us on.

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  9. Edible monsters? Atlantic kelp is for medicine and food.
    But this looks more like string.

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    1. Sabine-- This kelp is used for many things as well. I had no idea how much kelp is used worldwide.

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  10. The color of the water in the distance is so pretty.

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    1. Mark-- It was one of those days when the water looked green and turquoise in places. We loved it.

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  11. Love that last photo of the Bull Whip Kelp floating in the water. I've photographed the whips on the beach at places like the beach at Prairie Creek, but have never seen them floating like that. How cool!

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    1. bev-- I love knowing that you've seen this kelp. Such an interesting species.

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