Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Almost Wordless Wednesday: Fossils

It had been such a long while since we had gotten to see the fossils during a minus tide walk. For a few years the sands were very high and had covered all of this beautiful ancient history. So, we were really happy when our time in Capitola coincided with a significant minus tide and found that the sands had washed away.  The fossils that we hadn't seen in such a long time were finally visible again.




This last one is significantly different from the others. Nice large bone of some sort. I've done other posts about the fossils here, if you are interested in reading their history. I am such a huge fan of fossils I have even googled around to see how I could be fossilized after my death. Wouldn't you like to be a fossil too?

20 comments:

  1. Some days I feel like an old fossil already, I wouldn't recommend it!
    I was once leading a walk in an area known for its fossils. There was a rather nervous young woman in the party, so when we had to cross a stretch of scree slope I told everyone to bend forward slightly and search for fossils (even though the chances of finding one on a well walked path was remote to say the least. We'd walked about ten yards when I heard her call out to me. I thought the ruse hadn't worked and she'd lost her nerve. But, no, she'd just picked up an ammonite the size of a small plate!

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    1. John-- Hey, I feel like a fossil too sometimes! I googled ammonite, and wow how lucky that girl was to find such a thing. Now I want to find one!

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  2. I think I am a fossil to most people I work with. I love seeing fossils too maybe I should do a blog on the ones I have at home

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    1. Bill-- We of a certain generation are certainly fossils to the younger ones. I would love to see your fossil collection. Yes to a blog post!

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  3. To think that there is such ancient life in these rocks. Amazing.

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    1. Sabine-- It is always so good to be reminded of all the life that came before us. It really is amazing.

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    1. Dave-- Don't tell anybody that you heard it here. LOL!

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  5. I love seeing the fossils on the California coast! Had not thought about them for awhile. I was young when I first saw them, with no comprehension then of how old they are. I just liked the way they looked. Interesting that the article said that bird fossils are rare because bird bones are fragile. I'm thinking about my Dawn Redwood fossil from Fossil, Washington, and all the other plant fossils that are as plentiful there as shell fossils are at Capitola. I would think that plants would be more fragile than bird bones. Maybe not. Maybe there are different kinds of fossils. A fascinating topic!

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    1. am-- I was surprised by that too, that bird fossils are rare. Mmmm? I just love the fact of their beautiful existence for so much time. It is a compelling statement about our bodies, our bones, our earth.

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  6. Interesting! I wonder if any experts have surveyed that stretch of beach to determine what fossils are there. I read every now and then about new fossil species being found, sometimes creatures entirely different from any we have on earth today -- evolutionary dead-ends. Maybe some of those are on your beach!

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    1. Steve-- Oh yes, the beach has been researched and written about quite often. It's quite a sight. In the early 1990s we saw many more vertebrate and mammal fossils than we do now. It's really quite a stunning sight, all of it.

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  7. I laughed when I read the above comments because i was going to write that I feel like a fossil. I see I'm not alone. Before zooming in on your lovely photos, I was thinking how much that fossil rock with the shells reminds me of Newspaper Rock near Moab (petroglyphs covering a large rock). I've always loved fossils. I've written about this elsewhere, but my parents had good friends who had a farm on the west side of Ottawa. When we visited, Ernie used to bring out a bucket filled with odd-shaped limestone rocks -- flat things that had a sort of line around the edge. He would give us hammers and chisels and we'd sit on the ground cracking open these rocks (no safety glasses!). We'd find fish fossils inside all of them. They were so cool. Palaeontologists from the Canadian Museum of Nature had been out to survey his place and it was quite a treasure trove. Ernie is long gone now -- this was about 50 years ago -- and now his farm is completely covered by subdivisions. I think of all of those fossil rocks covered over by concrete and pavement. Maybe they're actually safer there -- and maybe in some distant future -- if humans are still on the planet -- the subdivision will just be another layer atop the fossil fish layer.

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    1. bev-- Oh yes, we fossils tend to hang out together! How interesting that you mentioned petroglyphs, I commented on a blog post with stunning petroglyph photos just other day about how how they reminded me of these fossils. I'm so glad you see it too. It's pretty stunning. I love the idea of the subdivision being just another layer atop the fish layer someday. It's the perfect perspective of time.

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  8. My husband's first job was as a paleontologist, even though he is an ichthyologist by training, and currently works in his right field. Still his years of preparing fossil fish for the museum's collection left me with a great appreciation for the beauty and history of fossils.

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    1. 37paddington-- I love knowing that your husband worked as a paleontologist and that he worked with fish fossils. There's something about holding fossils in your hands that helps in truly grasping the age of our world.

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  9. We are not "fossils"; we in a certain age range are CLASSICS! ;)

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    1. isabelita-- I love the idea of being "CLASSICS!" Thank you for that.

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