Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Haiku On A Wednesday

I've been thinking about life and death lately. I know, I know... when am I not thinking about life and death? But this has been different, it's also been about the times we are living in: The decline of our planet; the fight about God and religion and borders and war and bombs and money. All of it, everyday.

what we will become
this religion of our bones
sacred forever

16 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Colette-- Me too. I'm just hoping for the fossilization of us.

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  2. Everything is impermanent, as the Buddha said. Besides, even when things look bleak, there's also beauty everywhere. I'm reminding myself of this because I'm reading "The Uninhabitable Earth," which is pretty much a long litany of disaster. And then I go into my garden and -- flowers! Bees!

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    1. Steve-- Yes, yes beauty everywhere. It is what sustains me always. Alan Weisman wrote a book nearly a decade ago called "The World Without Us." It contemplates how the earth recovers, and how long it will take, once we humans are gone. It's a good read.

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  3. CCorax comment-- We will become an absence. No one left alive (microbes? some hardy insects? critters that live by sulfur vents in the deepest ocean?) will notice our absence though. Our species is so afraid of death, it is wiping life out so thoroughly that none will know we ever existed.

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    1. CCorax-- We are such a crazy complicated species, destroying so much and denying the obvious. My only hope is that humans disappear in a painless instant, and the world goes on without us.

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  4. what we will become
    this religion of our bones
    sacred forever

    Along with your beautiful photo reminding me of all the fossils in the cliff wall at Año Nuevo.

    Thank you so much, robin andrea, for reminding me that for now I am a witness to both life and death. The sacred present.

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    1. am-- The beach between Capitola and New Brighton has fossils in the cliffs and all along the shore line. We love it so much during the minus tides. It's so good to be reminded of the dance of life and death.

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  5. I just hope that there will be enough left of the earth that some future species will notice our fossils.

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    1. Patti-- I'm hoping for the same thing. Someone/something walking along a beach like this, looks down and smiles with appreciation of long ago days gone by.

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  6. In my secondary school, there were two murals in the hallway, one was an elaborate quote by Seneca "the greatest obstacle to living is expectancy". I hated it every morning. I wish now I didn't.

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    1. Sabine-- Yes, expectancy, I had such high expectations... an awakening. I was so so wrong.

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    1. Catalyst-- As long as it's fossilized when it passes, I'm good.

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  8. I have also been thinking a lot about life and death lately. In fact, for the last year, since my brother died. It's not necessarily a good place to be.

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    1. Mark-- It really is not such a good place to be, but that's where I am. I don't know if you ever crossed blogging paths with the birders Julie Zickefoose and her husband Bill Thompson. Well, on March 25th Bill died of stage 4 pancreatic cancer at the age of 57. His death really knocked me out. I'm hoping for an uplifting spring for you and me.

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