Monday, June 08, 2020

An Homage To Persistence

Out on our daily weeks we see them, the ones that persist, that grow through the cracks, that won't take no for answer.
From every crevice they push their way up. After the rains, they find their way to the light.
I admire their tenacity. They make me wonder about all the seeds waiting their turn beneath the miles and miles of sidewalks and roads, the pavement over their dreams.
When all crumbles away someday in the distant future, and you know as well as I do, it will happen, the oldest viable seeds will find their way.
Like this sprouting fennel plant in the gutter, next to the pole, the abandoned old shoes, and down the street from the fire hydrant, all the seeds wait their turn.

30 comments:

  1. Men with containers strapped to their back, heavily goggled and dressed in what I take to be impermeable clothing walk solemnly round our streets spraying such growths. Given the shortage of labour one might think there were other priorities but then I reflected: when movie makers want to suggest a town has been deserted, weeds in the gutters are one of the stock effects. Is it possible we might be depressed by this otherwise natural phenomenon? Absence of cars seems to have encouraged the weeds' proliferation although in this sense we are now getting to back to normal. It's quite conceivable that carbon monoxide and black particulates - from petrol (US: gas) and diesel engines respectively - might kill off weeds when you think of what they do to our lungs. I'm impressed by the way your weeds have flowered; these plants are not just surviving they're flourishing.

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    1. Roderick-- The only weeds I wouldn't want to see flourish here would be any invasive species. Otherwise, I say let them grow. So many people pull dandelions, and yet there is much goodness in that little crazy plant with such deep roots.

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  2. When I worked on the farm we had a field that was inhabited every summer by pigs. Seeds presumably germinated each year only to uprooted by our sows. This went on for over a quarter of a century. Then one year, for reasons I've forgotten, we didn't put the pigs out. The whole field became a blaze of poppies.
    There were no other poppies nearby so presumably poppy seeds had been germinating every year but there were still more in the soil that bloomed that year. Just how much seed is there in the soil?

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    1. John-- I love this story so much! The earth will survive and flourish and all the seeds will be there just waiting.

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  3. Thank you for your insight and photos today. The lasting power of seeds to expand and grow into something that can produce more seeds is astonishing, isn't it? That the oldest viable seed was 31,800 ±300 years old is something that puts everything in a new perspective for me. Thank you!

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    1. am-- Yes, the life of plants is pretty inspiring. I was blown away by that oldest seed story. I remembered reading about it a long time ago.

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  4. Yes, I am always amazed at what can grow up between the cracks! I love the last pic of the old shoes by the pole. I wonder what the story is there. Thanks for the post.

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    1. Ellen-- Ah the story of the shoes. Well, all over California people leave things on sidewalk corners and/or in boxes as free give-aways. It's all over the place, and sometimes people get carried away and leave mattresses and box springs out there too. I particularly liked the shoes because they reminded me of my dad.

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  5. Your imagination takes us to what might happen a long time ahead with seeds being the survivors.

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    1. Red-- I once read that fungus will outlast just about any other living thing on earth!

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  6. Love that determination. I agree, someday when we are long gone, green will be everywhere, uprooting pavements and putting oxygen into the air for the creatures that survive us.

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    1. Patti-- I love your perspective "green will be everywhere." Yes!! They will survive and thrive.

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  7. I love this, too. It's remarkable how resilient and persistent plants are. I read a book several years ago called "The World Without Us" and it pointed out that if people disappeared, plants would engulf our cities and pull down many of our structures in much less time than you'd think.

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    1. Steve-- I read that book too. Quite a good read. It gave me so much hope for the future without us.

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  8. and some of those 'weeds' turn out to be more nutritious than kale! Who knows what you could harvest from streets and sidewalks? I'd take a fennel clipping for sure.

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    1. Tara-- It's true. There's really so much to eat out there. I guess that's why we really should have been called Gatherer/Hunters from the very beginning. Yum fennel!

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  9. Love this post. I often wonder why I have so much trouble growing grass where I want and no trouble growing it where I don't want.

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    1. Dave-- Seeds have minds of their own! They go where they choose.

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  10. Way Cool - Simply Entertaining - Also, Dig The Old Crow Post

    Cheers

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    1. The Padre-- Glad you liked the post and the Old Crow music.

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  11. Sometimes, I think that we humans could follow the lead of weeds which are very persistent, always.

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    1. Beatrice-- Yes, we do need persistence from time to time.

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  12. Man, they're growing like . . .
    Well, you know.

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  13. The weeds here grow like weeds, of course, but you wouldn't believe how the pines grow. If there is any open space, pines sprout. Every place east of the Mississippi wants to be a forest.

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    1. Mark-- There is something hopeful about how pines grow. The earth will reclaim itself once we humans have bid adieu.

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  14. Beautiful reflection on persistence, and the teaching of the natural world.

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    1. 37paddington-- Thank you so much for your kind words.

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