Monday, March 22, 2021

The Season of Yellow

Spring is such a beautiful yellow time of the year. Everywhere we look yellow blossoms are blooming everywhere. Here in our yard we are letting our garden kale go to flower and then to seed, with the hopes of planting our own homegrown seeds this year. One surprise was this beautiful Rufous Hummingbird on its 4000 mile journey from Mexico to Alaska stopping in our yard for some kale flower nectar. Yes! So glad to nourish this little guy on its way north. (I posted this photo on Facebook, so some of you may have already seen it.)

Out in the front yard the succulent is blooming yellow as well. I don't know if you'll remember what the owl patch looked like before we planted the succulent. 

The above photo is from April 2017. Here's what it looks like now out there. 

We are so happy about that! And the weather has been good enough for nice long walks. While we were out on Sunday we noticed the wild mustard growing turning the meadows into beautiful sprawling fields of yellow. 

We were able to take a close up look at the mustard blooming on the side of the road on our walk home. It really surprised me how much the flowers and leaves looked like our blooming kale. In fact, for a moment I wondered if it might be wild kale. So of course when we got home I googled around to see if mustard and kale are related. Oh boy are they ever!

I found this excellent article in Vox about mustard. Not only is it the origins of kale, but of brussel sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage as well. What a wonderful eye-opening surprise that was. We are so thankful for this beautiful season of yellow. A delicious time of the year in every way!

36 comments:

  1. The photo of the hummingbird is lovely. Great capture. I didn't know about the mustard-kale connection but it is fascinating to contemplate. Nature can be so unexpected-- in a good way.

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    1. Ally-- So glad you liked the hummingbird photo. Those little Rufous really travel so very far for their mating season. Yes, nature can be so unexpected

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  2. Interesting about mustard and kale. I'd never have guessed.
    Your Owl looks quite content in his bed of yellow.

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    1. Patti-- I was so surprised by that mustard/kale connection. Who would've guessed that mustard would have such an impact in our lives for the past 2500 years!

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  3. That hummingbird is so pretty! You got the perfect shot in that photo! I like the before and after pic of the owl. Much better surrounded by all of that yellow beauty! Thanks for sharing your blooms with me...I have buds but too early for blooms yet.

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    1. EllenD-- It is always such a delight to see the Rufous on their spring migration. I have no idea how such a little bird can go so very far. We love the season of yellow here!

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  4. I knew all those things were related and all their flowers when left to go to seed look alike. spring where you are is yellow, spring here is pink and blue/purple. yellow comes later when it warms up more. and what a nice surprise visit from the hummingbird.

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    1. ellen-- After I found the surprising connection between mustard and kale, I went and looked at photos of broccoli flowerings. It is so cool to consider how this one plant has been transformed to feed us in so many ways. We love our spring visits from the Rufous hummingbird.

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  5. Lovely owl bed now! Cool hummer. Didn't know mustard was connected to the cabbage/kale/broccoli family.

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    1. Barbara-- Glad you liked the owl bed and the hummer! It was such a wonderful discovery to find the mustard connection to so many of our favorite veggies. Yum!

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  6. Cruciferous vegetables! Yes, all related. I love all the yellow and the "owl patch" really does look spectacular now. That hummingbird picture still blows my mind.

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    1. Steve-- I had no idea that all those cruciferous vegetables were related to mustard. Such a surprise. I am so glad you like the hummingbird photo. Thank you for that.

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  7. Love the owl! It's yellow season here also, mostly daffodils but soon rapeseed/canola will flower, it looks a lot like your mustard and is grown commercially here.

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    1. Sabine-- I just googled rapeseed and found that it is related to the mustard as well. What a wild long history that plant has. So glad you like the owl!

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  8. Very interesting info. On the western prairies mustard was one of the worst weeds as it spread and choked out grain crops.

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    1. Red-- When I see how it grows here with wild abundance, I can imagine how it difficult it would be for people trying to grow food.

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  9. Daffodils, aconites and celandine are our yellow flowers of early spring. I knew about the mustard connection from my days on the farm - "brassicas" is what the farmers call them all.

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    1. John-- Oh yes, the daffodils have been blooming here too. Such a welcome sight. It was such a surprise to us about the brassicas and how large that family of vegetables is and how it all started.

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  10. I remember being on a train from Nice to Paris once and being amazed at the fields of yellow mustard. Then I caught sight of a sign and realized we were in Dijon!

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    1. Catalyst-- I love this story... a train from Nice to Paris and the sight of fields of yellow mustard in Dijon. Perfect!

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  11. You have made me so envious with all that nice yellow color, Robin, as it will be quite a long time until any of it is showing in NH.

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    1. Beatrice-- Yellow flowers are blooming everywhere here. I look forward to when it blooms there for you.

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  12. What a lovely idea for a post! Yellow glory.

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    1. 37paddington-- Oh yes, yellow glory! Thank you for that.

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  13. My favorite yellow in your photos is the mustard. Here in early spring, one of the yellows we see is forsythia. There are lots of daffodils, too (-:

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    1. am-- So glad you like that mustard photo. It's really so beautiful out there with all the blooming yellow. Love forsythia and daffodils too.

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  14. So interesting about wild mustard. Yellow is a great color to signal spring.

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    1. Colette-- I was definitely surprised by the wild mustard history. Yes to the vibrant yellow of spring!

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  15. Yellow is such a hopeful colour. Enjoy spring in your part of the world.

    Thankfully we are going into autumn - it's been a long hot summer......

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    1. Dr Michelle-- I've been so distracted by what's going on in my country lately that I forgot that where you are is now in autumn. It's such a beautiful time in both of our hemispheres. Thank you for reminding me.

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  16. Yellow does seem to be the color of spring. right now we have daffodils, and forsythia, which doesn't look like much any other time of the year. I was surprised today to see some of our wild cherries with their pale pink, almost white blossoms. I don't remember seeing them last year.

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    1. Mark-- We do have some flowers here blooming pink and red, but the yellows dominate for now. Spring is so beautiful in every color.

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  17. Ah, hummingbirds! We're expecting them any minute. Some people near us have seen them in the last day or two, so we can expect them any time now. Beautiful shots; I love the yellows!

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    1. JS-- I wonder what kind of hummingbirds you have there. We have Anna's all year long. The Rufous only stop by in March on their way north. They are a bright red reminder of Spring. Glad you liked the yellows!

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  18. Nice little surprise that seeing that hummingbird. Check out my Wednesday post to see the little surprise I had the other day

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    1. Billy-- We only ever see them on their journey north. It is always a lovely surprise.

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