Wednesday, March 10, 2021

When Virtual Paths Cross

I first wrote this blog post on February 28th. It was the post that I originally had planned for last Wednesday.  But that was when all the blogging issues had finally gotten the better of me. The timeline of blogging woes began on the day I learned about Lawrence Ferlinghetti's death. Ferlinghetti died in the night on February 22 and I read the news on the morning of the 23rd which sent me on an internet journey of nostalgia and shared grief. What I did not know was that that was also the day that Firefox, my web browser, updated their program. One of the new features was something called "Total Cookie Protection" which they describe this way: 

"Today we are pleased to announce Total Cookie Protection, a major privacy advance in Firefox built into ETP Strict Mode. Total Cookie Protection confines cookies to the site where they were created, which prevents tracking companies from using these cookies to track your browsing from site to site."

The impact that had my ability to stay logged in even on our own blog was crazy.  It showed some blogs I visit daily as not being safe. It showed some blogs that said that I had approved cookies at that site. It was chaos. I don't like my routines disrupted like this, not during a pandemic!! So, after two weeks of this craziness, I reloaded my entire hard-drive files from a backup dated February 13. And voila... everything was back to normal. It's likely I could have just reverted to the previous Firefox application without going fully nuclear, but I went nuclear instead. LOL! 

 Here's the blog post I had planned to post two weeks ago, in memory of Lawrence Ferlinghetti.


The best part of blogging is finding good, kindhearted, thoughtful people all around the world. We read the words of people on our beautiful blue planet. The ones who walk around in New Zealand or Australia. The ones who walk around Trafalgar Square or New York City. The ones who walk around in Florida or in Germany, Texas or North Carolina, Canada or Maine, California, Georgia, Washington, or Arizona. They tell us their stories. They enrich our lives. They remind us that we are all connected. 

On the day I read of Lawrence Ferlinghetti's passing I googled around trying to remember if I had taken my parents to hear him read at the University of Colorado in Boulder back in 1982. I remembered that I had taken them to hear someone, but I couldn't remember who (it was Gary Snyder). So I googled "Ferlinghetti Boulder." The second listing that came up was this blog post on a blog called The Daily Beat. I was blown away when I clicked the link. There was a photo of the poster of The Jack Kerouac Conference, the same poster that  we have had hanging in every living room for the past 39 years.  I read the post and was so delighted to find another fan of the Beat writers. I decided I had to email Rick Dale, the blogger. We have been corresponding ever since. It is truly the best part of this crazy interconnected world. Rick did a blog post about the first email I sent him. 

I was so grateful that our virtual paths had crossed. I hope you'll read his post. Thank you, Rick!

 

24 comments:

  1. Ah, and I just gave up Firefox on my new computer, thinking it was the new device which didn't let blogger work through that browser...so I'm using Chrome now. Sigh. Yes isn't blogging a great way to meet friends!

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    1. Barbara-- I hope Firefox figures out how to fix this blogger problem or a lot of us are going to head over to Chrome. Blogging has enriched my world!

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  2. The beauty of the Net is that all those whose paths we crossed but didn't realize the connections come to life through the Internet. What a wonderful tool.
    It was interesting how many big names you had met at that conference and it is sad that some of the autographs have faded.

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    1. Patti-- Blogging has so enriched my life. These virtual friendships we have made mean the world to me.
      Someone referred to the Kerouac Conference as "Woodstock of the Beats." That really describes the week it was.

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  3. It's surprising what we find when we poke around on the internet. There are small things that we've forgotten about or never knew about.

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    1. Red-- The internet has utterly enriched our lives. It's been a wonderful tool for connecting with people around the world.

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  4. I used Firefox for a little while trying to get away from Safari but it was troublesome in a few ways so I eventually ditched it for Chrome which I use now. and yeah, so many friends I haven't met face to face and the ones I have it was like we had always known each other.

    for all that I fully embraced being a hippy, I was never into the beat poets but that could have been from lack of exposure from 1. growing up in Texas and 2. growing up in my family.

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    1. ellen-- I'm starting to think about migrating over to Chrome. I'm not sure why I never use Safari, but I don't.
      A dear friend introduced me to the poetry of Ferlinghetti when I was 15 years old. I loved Coney Island of The Mind. Then I read Howl by Ginsberg and I was awakened to a whole new way of seeing the world.

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  5. Lovely post! Everything under the sun is new! Coincidentally, I've just started reading a book (Going On Being) by Mark Epstein, M.D., who took a summer course at Naropa in 1974 where he met Ram Dass, among others who were teaching there at that time. Anne Waldman and Allen Ginsberg, co-founders of the Jack Kerouac School at Naropa University, were in Bob Dylan's 1978 film "Renaldo and Clara," which included the scene where Allen Ginsberg visit Jack Kerouac's grave.

    And thanks for the link to The Daily Beat.

    So happy to hear that you were able to solve the blog problem. Yaaayyyyy!

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    1. am-- I so wish I could have met Ram Dass. His book Be Here Now was the most profound read for me. I am so glad that he was writing at the time I so needed his perspective.

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  6. As a blog reader, I discover what a small world it is as I make connections with people all over the globe! I love reading the posts of my blog friends each day! Thank you!

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    1. EllenD-- Yes, this small world we inhabit together no matter how many miles we are apart. Here we are. Thank you for reading our blog.

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  7. Over my years of blogging I've decided the blogosphere might be the coolest way of connecting I've ever experienced. Yours is a good example of that. We meet the people we're meant to know, if you trust the process. And don't use Firefox, I guess.

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    1. Ally Bean-- Yes, blogging has helped me find old friends even though I've never met them in real life. It is the coolest way of connecting. Thank you for being a part of it.

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  8. I'm glad you ironed out your blogging problems, even though it required nuclear intervention! Yes, it's amazing how the blogosphere connects us all, comparing our common interests and sharing our stories. Isn't that Jack Kerouac portrait the same one that used to be painted on the wall of the alley next to City Lights books? (Which I think is named Kerouac Alley, if I'm not mistaken...?)

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    1. Steve-- Blogging has helped us feel connected to so many people around the world and to see sights we would never otherwise see. It's so wonderful.
      I've only been to Kerouac Alley once and I don't know if that portrait is there. It probably is. I googled around to find out and have so far not had any luck answering that question.

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  9. very cool, Robin. I also find it fascinating that a self-described misanthrope finds so much connection around the world, engaging in interesting conversations and sparking new friendships. It's wonderful!

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    1. Tara-- You made me laugh out loud. Thank you for that. You remind me exactly why I love blogging. I get to have dear friends of the heart and still be a quiet homebody misanthrope. It's truly wonderful!

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    1. I thought of you when I heard about his passing.

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    2. Catalyst-- Your comment brought tears to my eyes. Thank you for that.

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  11. In the early days everyone insisted I used Firefox. I must have tried it half a dozen times and always ended up deleting it. It interfered with the simple act of doing a post - the typeface would abruptly change font and/or size for a para, then the leading would tighten up. All the Firefox fans said I was deluded but every time I deleted it the problems went away. In my opinion I think people were drawn by the jazzy name.

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    1. Roderick-- I am still contemplating leaving Firefox for another browser. Not sure which one to choose. If you have any recommendations I would love to know.

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