Monday, May 03, 2021

Two Sky Views

 It had been so long since I saw any atmospheric optics I began to wonder if the sun and ice particles had left us because of the Coronavirus. I thought it was gone forever. Then I saw this.


Oh yes! That made me so happy. It looked like the dark cloud was exhaling a corona/iridescent cloud. I loved it. The sky's beauty was back! 

Then a few days later I saw this.


Roger and I had gone out to roll the garbage can to the curb for the next morning's pick up. I looked up at the sky as I always do and then ran in the house to get the camera. This is a 22 degree halo with sundogs, a parry arc, upper tangent arc, and above it all circumzenithal arc. 

The ephemeral beauty of our skies reminded us of living life in the moment without worry and with hearts lifted as high and far as we can see.

40 comments:

  1. What we notice in the world seems to be very dependent on our mood at the time, so I'm glad to hear that you're seeing such beauty again. As the old cliche goes "things are looking up"!

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    1. John-- Yes, mood and remembering to run outside when there are a few clouds and sun. It's often a very brief moment.

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  2. Wow, that second one gave you a bundle of awe. It was trying to all at once make up for the skies you have been missing

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    1. Patti-- I run outside quite often to take a look up. Seeing this definitely lifted my spirits.

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  3. I'm thrilled to see your beautiful sky (sun) again...and that you can describe all those geometric phenomena. I certainly would have just noticed it and not known a word of those descriptions!

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    1. Barbara-- I have been reading about atmospheric optics for more than ten years, after I first looked up and saw the most beautiful iridescent cloud. I was hooked!

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  4. You make some interesting observations about the sky. You use terms that I've never heard of. Now I'm wondering where and how you learned things about the sky that make it so interesting.

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    1. Red-- Check out the Atmospheric Optics website. Here is a link: http://www.atoptics.co.uk/
      I have learned so much there. The sky is full of moments like this, but they are always ephemeral. One thing to remember is to always block the sun, but to look for the colors and optics that surround it when there are light clouds.

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  5. wow! we get full blown rainbows but sundogs rarely happen here. I guess it's because we are so much farther south and no ice particles in the atmosphere.

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    1. ellen-- The ice crystals are fairly high up in the atmosphere. Here is what google has to say about it: The slight whitening of a clear blue sky caused by ice crystals high in the troposphere can be a sign that a weather front (and rain) is approaching, as moist air is carried to high levels and freezes to ice crystals.
      I'm hoping you will start to see them when the light clouds are very high.

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  6. I never knew these things about the sky until you started showing me. Thanks!

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    1. EllenD-- I never knew about atmospheric optics until I saw my very first iridescent cloud. That sent me on a journey of love that has lasted for more than a decade. It is a brief ephemeral moment of beauty.

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  7. We rarely have "sky" that is not a cover of grey flannel. Great observational skills, while taking out the trash. Showtime in the sky!

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    1. Linda-- A bit of light cloud cover can be a canvas for atmospheric optics. Yes, showtime in the sky!

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  8. Wow, you see the weirdest wonderful things. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Sabine-- I'm so glad you like these weird and wonderful things!

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  9. Holy Mackerel! I didn't realize what a scientist you are! Great pictures, BTW. Keep looking upward.

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    1. Catalyst-- Not exactly a scientist, but a true lover of the ephemeral nature of atmospheric optics. I'm a little obsessive about it. LOL!

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  10. The sky is breathtaking and ever changing..blink and you've missed it!
    Hi via Catalyst 🙂

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    1. gz-- Yes, "blink and you've missed it..." That describes it perfectly. Thank you so much for stopping by and commenting.

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  11. Beautiful! The sky never disappoints, does it? (Well, OK, maybe sometimes it does.)

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    1. Steve- LOL! The sky disappoints all the time here. Oy the fog and endless gray. But I still run out and take a look, just in case.

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  12. We've had a few days warm enough and sunny enough here to sit down on my covered porch, with my back against the door and my legs stretched out in the sun. It's a perfect place for sky viewing in hopes of seeing atmospheric optics. I'm grateful to you for introducing me to this beauty that I didn't see before!

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    1. am-- I love thinking of you sitting on your porch with. your legs stretched out into the sunlight. Yes! Waiting for the atmospheric optics!

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  13. That is something I never see here though we did have some very dark rain clouds today and now it is raining

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    1. Billy-- These atmospheric optics are quite ephemeral, lasting a very short time. It's knowing when to run out and look up. I hope you get some sunshine soon!

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  14. Sky watching can certainly provide endless fascination and wonderful imagery as you well know, Robin. I don't recall seeing images like you have shown, but perhaps need to look up a bit more.

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    1. Beatrice-- I feel like a broken record sometimes, but I am always so thrilled when I see these ephemeral skies of beauty. Yes, look up!!

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  15. Like what John said What we notice in the world seems to be very dependent on our mood at the time...... but then we can choose to be always in a good mood.

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    1. Haddock-- I think I'll work on being in a good mood all the time! Thank you for stopping by and commenting. Much appreciated.

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  16. Hi Robin -- I tried to comment when this post first went up, but for some reason I just can't comment from my phone. Anyway, all I wanted to say was something about how much we can miss when we don't just look up. On the other hand, some people just don't appreciate what we see in the sky. Way back I posted on my blog about the amazing, once-in-a-lifetime display of arcs and halos and just about anything you could possibly see related to the sun. I'm pretty sure I mentioned telling a coworker to look at the sky, and all he did was say, "Hmm," and walk away. I stood there for probably 15 minutes unable to take my eyes off of it.

    And, also, the second shot was a great catch. It's not easy to get good photos of that sort of thing. It's pretty rare to see all those halos and arcs. I'll be not many other people saw it.

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    1. Mark-- I remember that post so well. It was such an awesome moment. I have wanted to see something like that ever since. The ephemeral beauty of our skies keeps me hopeful. A beauty that will continue always. That second photo was such a surprise, and I was utterly grateful to have looked up.

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  17. I've not seen sundogs yet this year . . .

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    1. Ontario Wanderer-- I so hope you get to see them soon. Thank you so much for stopping by and commenting. So good to hear from you.

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  18. Several times in my youth I noticed sharply defined sun's rays shooting out of darkish clouds at an angle and - for all I knew - hitting the ground with great force. I was told by some solemn acquaintance who, I'm sure by now, has been translated into glory that this denoted souls going up to heaven. I didn't believe him. For one thing the traffic seemed to be going in the opposite direction; for another, this didn't seem an appropriate way of celebrating the passage of people en route to Hell. Which brings up an important literary point: does Hell/hell deserve a capital letter? J'attends, avec impatience, votre réponse.

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    1. Roderick-- It sounds like what you saw was crepuscular rays, and from your description it must have been quite a display. I do not believe in heaven or hell, but am utterly moved by the ephemeral mixing of sunlight and ice crystals to produce momentary displays of beauty. Because heaven and hell are human stories, neither deserves a capital letter, unless it is the first word of a sentence. J’espère que cela rĂ©pond Ă  votre question.

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  19. You do get the nicest views by looking up, Robin, and always find a nice surprise.

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    1. Beatrice-- I love looking up, even though my neck complains a bit!

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  20. I wonder how many people never see the sky's magic because they don't look with your eyes. Thank you for sharing it. Love.

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    1. 37paddington-- Given the times we're living in, it's always good to find the balance with beauty. Thank you for stopping by and commenting. Hope all is well for you and your family.

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