Monday, October 18, 2021

Our African Violet

 I water the house plants every Sunday morning. It's a once-a-week ritual. When I watered our African Violet I thought about how old it is. It was a gift to us when we bought our first house in 1995. This is a 26 year old plant. Who knows? It actually could be older. We've had it for 26 years. I love it and it seems happy. Here are a few pics of it over the years.

This is what it looked like in 2008. It was 13 years old and not particularly flowery. We had just spent four years in Port Townsend, Washington on the Olympic Peninsula so perhaps it was just responding to the endless gloomy weather there. 
This was taken in 2013. It was much happier in Grass Valley. If it could talk it would have shouted out gratitude to the sunny days there. Eighteen years with the bums.

This was taken two days ago. It's still pretty happy. Not so sure about the weather. It may have heard us talking about the La Nina winter heading our way, with the first real week of rain in the forecast. Twenty-six years with those bums seems to be working out pretty well. 

Have you ever had a plant for this long? 

28 comments:

  1. If it was started by a cutting (the most common way) then it is a clone, so it it likely much older than its time with you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paul-- I love knowing that it's even older than I thought. Wow!

      Delete
  2. Wow, am I impressed with its longevity and beauty. I have never had one last a year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Patti-- It really surprises me how long we've had this little beauty. We do love it.

      Delete
  3. Mine stayed outside without any care from me all summer...and no rain landed on the covered balcony. I just brought 2 inside. I have grandchildren of Kalanchoes that are 40 years old!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Barbara-- I love that you've had plants for so long that you have their grandchildren. That's truly a lovely thing. I've never heard of kalanchoes. I'm going to have to google that.

      Delete
  4. My 7th grade teacher, Sister Claudette, loved African violets and had them all along the window sill in our classroom! So whenever I see an African violet, I think of her! You have done well with yours - I have never been able to keep one alive for long. I think I overwater...
    Good job, Robin Andrea!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. EllenD-- I love your story about the African violets and your 7th grade teacher. It's wonderful when a flowering plant stirs a fond memory. Wonderful!

      Delete
  5. my mother grew african violets and I had some for a couple of years. don't remember what happened to them. I have a ponytail palm that we got as a wedding present so it's at least 45 years old, older as it wasn't a baby when we got it but it was small. I planted it in the round when we sold the city house and moved all the rest of the stuff out here. The bulb is huge now and has sprouted a full head of 'hair' after last February's arctic freeze.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ellen-- You remind me that we have a huge palm in our dining room that came as a little plant Roger could hold in his hands ten years ago. They do get big very fast! It's wonderful to have these plants with so much history.

      Delete
  6. That's a long while to keep any plant. My mother used to have African Violets though I don't think any survived that long.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. John-- It's pretty cool to think about how long we've had it. My sister has a plant that my parents used to have. It must be 50 years old by now.

      Delete
  7. Linda Plumley MorrisOctober 18, 2021 1:09 PM

    I have a Schefflera given to me as a gift in 1975, when my first baby was born. This plant is a part of the family!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Linda-- Oh yes, a Schefflera! I love that you wrote that word because it is the name of the plant that my sister has that came from our parents. It's nearly as old as yours. Thank you so much for that and for stopping by and commenting.

      Delete
  8. Sweet to know that you and Roger have had that African violet through all your moves in the past 26 years. I had no idea that they lived that long. I have a white one that was in sad shape when a neighbor picked it up at the local Food Bank several years ago. She nurtured it back to good health and then gave it to me as a gift. It has done amazingly well, blooming profusely several times a year. My oldest houseplant is a Streptocarpus with purple flowers and is at least 30 years old.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. am-- I love knowing that you have a white African violet that has been blooming for so many years. I just googled Streptocarpus and saw what a beauty that flowering plant is. It's wonderful that plants live with us for so long and enrich our lives like this!

      Delete
  9. That's amazing. Beautiful plant. Well done for keeping it alive! I don't have any patience for indoor plants but it must have brought you a lot of joy over the years.

    Embrace the El Nina - we have had so much rain this winter and I love it. Far better than sorching summers with their threats of fires.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dr Michelle-- I grew up with lots and lots of indoor plants. In fact my parents had a half-wall built in the entry way of our suburban home and put a long beautiful planter on it. I hadn't thought of that in years!
      Yes, we are embracing the coming storms. California needs this rain. Earth needs this rain. We all need this rain.

      Delete
  10. I have never had an indoor plant that long. Wow. My mother always had African Violets potted up in her house. They remind me of her. Now they will remind me of you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Colette-- This is the longest I've ever had an indoor plant. Now I feel incredibly protective of it. Your comment brought sweet tears to my eyes. Thank you for that.

      Delete
  11. That's impressive, and it does look SO healthy! I have a couple of plants that came from cuttings taken from other plants that I got in the mid-'80s. So they're children of my old plants, I guess. My brother still has one of those plants, and it's about 35 years old. (A "purple heart" plant.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Steve-- I was hoping you'd stop by and take a look at this African violet. It's such a wonderful thing to know that friends and family and fellow bloggers have plants that have stayed with us for so long.

      Delete
  12. In 1987 I was taking my toddler for an outing in Santa Cruz when she broke off a little piece of a jade plant hedge and handed it to me. It's now about 4 feet tall and almost as wide. It lives on our porch in the cascade foothills in the summer and in the living room the other 10 months.
    Your plant looks like it is actually several plants. You could divide the plants and pot them separately. But then you'd have a lot of plants to take care of. Maybe best to leave well enough alone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Molly-- I love your 1987 Santa Cruz story. I lived in Santa Cruz 1989-2004. Now I wonder if our paths have ever crossed. We left Santa Cruz and moved to the Olympic Peninsula (2004-2008), so it's interesting that we've traveled similar paths, now that you are in the Cascades.
      Yes, you are so right. When I water the plant and sometimes touch the soil to make sure it's damp, I notice that there are three separate growths. I just thought it came from one root system, but it may actually be three plants. Thank you so much for your observation. Yes, I plan to leave well enough alone.

      Delete
    2. Robin, we lived in Santa Cruz from 1987-1994. For the last 4 years I was a student at UCSC so our paths may well have crossed at some point.

      Delete
    3. MollyTrolley-- I was an academic preceptor (adviser) at Crown College from 1990-1992 and then the grad adviser in the Economics Department 1992-1994. Maybe our paths did cross.

      Delete
  13. My gawd! I have never had a plant that long...I've moved too much and often, depending on the distance, give my plants away rather than move them. Your sweet lil' plant is hardy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tara-- We've moved that African violet so many times. It has been such a fine little traveler. It really is hardy. We love it.

      Delete