Friday, December 03, 2021

A Fib

  ...but what I am writing here is the truth and not a fib at all. 


Roger was diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation (often referred to as A-fib).  Mayo Clinic, our go-to website for all matters related to health had this about it:

Atrial fibrillation (A-fib) is an irregular and often very rapid heart rhythm (arrhythmia) that can lead to blood clots in the heart. A-fib increases the risk of stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications.

During atrial fibrillation, the heart's upper chambers (the atria) beat chaotically and irregularly — out of sync with the lower chambers (the ventricles) of the heart. For many people, A-fib may have no symptoms. However, A-fib may cause a fast, pounding heartbeat (palpitations), shortness of breath or weakness.

Episodes of atrial fibrillation may come and go, or they may be persistent. Although A-fib itself usually isn't life-threatening, it's a serious medical condition that requires proper treatment to prevent stroke.

 He has an appointment with his doctor on Monday and still many more days of wearing his Zio patch. That patch will provide lots of information, and then we will know how to proceed. He is still experiencing all of the symptoms, which will be recorded on this device. In fact, he is experiencing quite a bout of it as I type this. 

That's life these days. 

Hope all is well for you, dear friends out there in internet blogland. 

44 comments:

  1. I'm sorry to read this Robin. It sounds terrifying. I hope there is something that can be done to make Roger more comfortable. And relieve your stress too!

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    1. Dr Michelle-- It's pretty scary, but it will be good to have as much information as possible. Many more days of the patch ahead, and then analysis. The wait will be the hardest part.

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  2. My neighbour has it and for the last few years the doctors have kept adjusting her medication to try and get it just right - bit by bit they seem to be succeeding.

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    1. Weaver of Grass-- We love knowing that there are medications that actually work. It gives us hope. Thank you for sharing your neighbor's story with us.

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  3. Aww robin, I am so sorry to hear this. I have been dealing with the same thing for several years. The good thing is that it is treatable. I am glad your Dr. is on top of this. Please let us know how they plan to treat this. Sending only good thoughts for an easy fix.

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    1. Patti-- I may email you to find out more about how you have been handling your AFib. I hope you are doing well, and thank you for your good thoughts.

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  4. Oh dear, I do hope Roger's condition is managed and he is more comfortable! I've a friend who had some kind of surgery on her A-fib, but I don't remember what it was all about. She hasn't had any more problems that I know of. Hope you're doing ok yourself...taking care of others is sometimes stressful too.

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    1. Barbara-- There are several options ahead as we wend our way through the medical world. We'll know a bit more on Monday after is doc appointment. Yes, it is a stressful time.

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  5. There is so much they do nowadays to correct heart problems. My son has an Apple watch that tells him when he has AFib. It actually displays a small EKG reading which I find amazing. His episode of AFib went away and he has been fine since. Hope Roger can get his A Fib taken care of soon so he can get back to his normal routines.

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    1. EllenD-- We've been reading about those Apple watches and how they work. There may be one in our future. I'm so sorry that your son has experienced AFib and glad to know it has gone away. Yay!!!

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  6. Oh yikes, I'm sorry to hear that. It's good that he's got a patch and is gathering the info needed to get treatment. Let us know how it goes!

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    1. Steve-- It was a surprise to get that diagnosis, although, he had been having issues that seemed heart related. Oh yes, I will definitely keep the blog updated.

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  7. My apple watch checks for that. Think my wife has something like it as she gets palpitations

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    1. Billy-- I do think there may be an Apple Watch in our future. It's amazing what technology can do these days.

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  8. I hope that A-fib is controlled for Roger very quickly.

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  9. Sounds like he has his A-fib under as much control as he can muster to this point. Good luck.

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    1. MRMacrum-- Yes, and we'll know more in two weeks to see how to proceed.

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  10. a fib / not a fib. The truth is paradoxical, isn't it? Sending love to you and Roger, as you go through this medical situation together. I'm remembering when the issue was colon cancer.

    This morning when I opened my porch door to look out into the darkness, I saw frost and also saw that a hummingbird was up early visiting the salvia plant that is still flowering on my porch. The hummingbird was making a quiet clicking sound. I wish you and Roger could have seen the hummingbird as well as the stars, all good for the heart.

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    1. am-- Yes, the truth is paradoxical. I love that! I also love that you heard that hummingbird at the salvia plant and that you could see the stars there. We see the hummers here, but it's been so foggy lately, no star at all.

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  11. You have taught me more than I ever knew about the ailment that led to my pacemakers. Actually, since I am one of the lucky ones who never had any symptoms, more than I ever wanted to know. :^)

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    1. Catalyst-- You really are very lucky that you had no symptoms. We're learning more everyday about what our bodies do as they age.

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  12. I wish you the best with your upcoming doctor's appointment. A friend was diagnosed with this, had some kind of minor surgery, and is fine now. But while she had her attacks it was scary.

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    1. Ally Bean-- We'll see what the doc says on Monday and what the test results show in a few weeks, and then we'll know how to proceed. It's a bit scary. We appreciate your good wishes.

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  13. Yikes. Waiting to hear what the next steps are for him.

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    1. Colette-- Yes, we're waiting for that too. The medical world takes a lot of time.

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  14. Love to you and Roger, Robin. That kind of stress is tiring in itself. ♥

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    1. Val-- Thank you so much for your kind words. It's so nice to hear from you.

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  15. It's the most common medical condition in the world. I have it too. Actually I had flutter (rapid heart beat) in the right atria for which I had an ablation that got rid of that and afib. Still have the afib mostly being controlled by medication (sotalol) but they can also do an ablation for that. I'm just not ready to submit to that. Depending on how severe and long lasting the attacks are it can be a little scary but, like my doctor and Mayo clinic say, not inherently life threatening. My doctor also has me on eliquis to prevent blood clots.

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    1. ellen-- Thank you so much for sharing you AFib experience. It really helps us feel much calmer about what comes next. it's good to know it can be handled relatively easily. Yay! Thank you, and stay well and healthy there.

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    2. I had an ablation 3 years ago and that got rid of most, but not all, the strange electrically activity. While not a painful procedure, lying on my back for 7 hours while they did was a real pain!!

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    3. Tara - wow, 7 hours. For the flutter it was less than 2 hours I think and they put me in twilight sleep but my doctor said for the afib it would take about 4 hours and they would put me under completely.

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  16. I caught my first aFib bout on my Apple Watch nearly two years ago. The word "stroke" scared me enough that I see a pulmonologist every 6. months. So far all that it has required is blood thinners, and I'm back out doing everything I've been doing since I retired.

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    1. Loren-- I think Roger is going to get an Apple Watch. It sounds like a good thing to have. It has made a huge difference to read about our fellow bloggers who experience AFib, take medications, and continue on with their lives. Thank you for sharing your story with us.

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  17. I hope he has a meaningful and helpful doc visit on Monday. Thank goodness he got the diagnosis so that he can be treated. No fun to know what your body has been doing behind your back. Naughty body!

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    1. Tara-- Meaningful and helpful doc visit? Is there such a thing? I hope so too. but lately medical care has seemed very crappy to me. It always blows my mind when we discover what our bodies have been doing behind our backs.

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  18. I can't add anything helpful to all the other comments, I only hope it all turns out well.

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  19. Oooh, I know this makes you worry, but you are on top of things, so one foot in front of the other, he will be just fine. Sending love.

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    1. 37paddington-- Yes, one foot in front of the other. We do persist. Thank you for your love.

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  20. While I know that this diagnosis is worrisome new for Roger and yourself, Robin, knowing the issue and learning possible treatments is the good news. A good friend of ours has the same condition and as others have noted is taking meds and has received treatment and is doing well. We know you will keep us updated and our good thoughts are sith you both.

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    1. Beatrice-- The words of our fellow bloggers have helped us feel much safer about the medical road ahead. We had no idea how many people have experienced this and have found ways to be well and carry on. You give us hope. Thank you for that.

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  21. Oh Robin. What a scary bummer. My *idea* of you and Roger is that you are both invincible. Just Dharma bumming around endlessly and enjoying saying hello to the cows and doggies and even the odd human.

    The Mayo Clinic is my number one site too and lord knows it has had a workout in the last several years with me driving the keyboard. It's good to have such clear research and science available in the realm of "white man's medicine" as Ken Wilbur so aptly called it.

    I've got my own episodic "premature atrial contractions" that happen for me some times. And one doctor tells me she won't be surprised if I end up with A-fib at some point. I hope not.

    Roger is lucky to have you and you are lucky to have him. Long may you run :)

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    1. John-- It's so good to hear from you. We love your *idea* of us. You've got most of it right, we do moo at the cows (we sometimes "om" at them too!), and we woof at all the doggies. We even pet them if they let us.
      I love knowing that you check in with the Mayo Clinic as well. Yes, it is "white man's medicine" and they often have it right. They help me feel calmer about most of the things that scare the shi*t out of me.
      I seem to remember your heart issue. I think some time a while back we've emailed each other about it. Or I could be making this all up. Stress has a way of filling in the blanks for me.
      It's true, Roger and I are lucky we have each other. Like you and Mel, that love that connects you heart to heart, spirit to spirit. Add to that the sweet virtual friendships here, and we're pretty lucky.
      We may not run, but we do try to hobble along everyday.

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