Monday, April 18, 2022

Holiday Morning Sky

I looked out the window early Sunday morning and saw a lovely 22 degree halo with a hint of an upper tangent arc.

I ran outside to click a quick pic. A neighbor was walking by so I showed her the halo. She was so surprised. She said she would have never noticed it. She asked me if that kind of display only happens here on the north coast. I had to tell her it's one of the most common atmospheric optics that actually happens everywhere. I showed it to my brother as well. He said the same thing as the neighbor. He would have never seen it. I'm hoping I planted a nice little seed of sky love in both of them.

I also noticed this lovely little display as well.

I went out to the back of the house to block the sun with our roof so I could photograph the very nice sundogs, that hint of rainbow color on the sides of the halo. 

Then I went back out front and saw a parhelic circle to the left of the sundog. 

What a delightful display this was on a lovely blue-sky not rainy Easter Sunday 2nd day of Passover morning.

When I started to write this post I thought about adding a bit of Yiddish to celebrate the holidays. So, in celebration you must all be thinking after seeing these photos, "Oy gevalt, she's at it again. More of those fakakta atmospheric optic photos. She's definitely mashugana." LOL!


26 comments:

  1. And I hope you always remain mashugana! (Did I get that right?)

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    1. Paul-- You got it right! Mashugana is in my genes.

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  2. I am like your neighbor and brother. For years I suspected you had a much more versatile sky than I had but it is just that you look. I am so glad you do and record it for all of us oblivious ones. Thank you.

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    1. Patti-- It's true. It's because I look and know where to look. Once you spot an atmospheric optic, you'd be looking all the time.

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  3. Nicely said, and wonderful you see these things, which even have scientific names, in the skies. I'd have been happy with just a blue sky. Today we've got rain waking me up!

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    1. Barbara-- I would have bene happy with a clear blue sky today too. Rainy and very windy day here.

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  4. We had a dusting of snow last night! I thought those sky designs were made specially for you, Robin Andrea! I have to look more closely at the sky. I had never even heard all of those scientific-sounding terms before I read your blog! Thank you!

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    1. EllenD-- It's really crazy weather lately. My older brother in Virginia is having some snow flurries today and then rain. The sky is full of beauty and surprises. I hope you'll take a look up.

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  5. Being an outdoors person, I've seen these all my life. Attaching a name to them helps to know what they actually are.

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    1. Red-- I bet you see some amazing skies there. There are some atmospheric optics that only occur far north.

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  6. I've seen occasional sundogs down here but I don't think I've ever seen a halo. Maybe we don't get the atmospheric conditions you do.

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    1. ellen-- I love that you have seen sundogs. They typically occur with 22 degree halos. Sometimes those halos are very faint. I hope you keep looking up. I'd love to see what you see in the skies there.

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  7. Happy Pesach, my friend. I hope it is sweet.

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    1. 37paddington-- Thank you so much for that. I love seeing the word "pesach" here. Reminds me of my grandmother.

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  8. Gorgeous skies and I would never have noticed that either. We are lucky to have you point out so much of the sky to us!!

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    1. kenju-- I'm so drawn to the ephemeral beauty of our skies. Thank you for your kind words.

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  9. Robin, what I thought was how wonderful that you not only saw but captured these sky shots, but that you shared some interesting facts with us. Too often, many fail to just look up but you always do that.

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    1. Beatrice-- I've learned over the years where and when to look for these sky moments. Thank you for your kind words. I'm always so glad to share the beauty.

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  10. I think you must be an astronomer. Or an astronaut. I know, you are astounding. And your knowledge of the skies is amazing.

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    1. Catalyst-- I must be an astronomer because I hate to fly and haven't been on an airplane in 30 years. So I could never be an astronaut. I so love what happens with sunlight and ice crystals in our skies.

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  11. Nice use of Yiddish, my friend! Your love of atmospheric optics has always inspired me to look up. I'm glad you shared with your neighbor and brother. I think you have planted more seeds. We need more wonder and joy in this world, and your love of the sky fits the bill.

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    1. Tara-- I'm so glad you liked the Yiddish and the sky. It is good to find wonder and joy in the world. I try to do that everyday. I know you do too, my friend.

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  12. Well that was rather nice to see in the morning

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    1. Billy-- It really was a wonderful atmospheric optic display.

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